Wheee!

by Alexander Millar

Price: £2,995.00
Qty:

The wonderful thing about having been brought up in that little mining village of Springside on the west coast of Scotland, was that the people or “Springdingers” as we sometimes refer to ourselves, were jam packed with characters, as usually is the case with small town folk. However, I think that my kin were a breed apart. When I was a wee snot covered ‘toe rag’ I would delight in taking note of all the sights and sounds that surrounded me…. I remember stopping and gazing in amazement at events that were very fleeting, but in a split second they would captivate me for what felt like an eternity. Football games, games of tig or tag, cops and robbers would all be embossed in my mind as I noticed these funny little events or scenes play out in front of me. All the small and insignificant details would become magnified and all encompassing, time simply stood still.

The two things that were commonplace in the village were bikes, everyone had one, and the other thing that meant the world to me was a colourful balloon... strangely enough. Perhaps, because as an only child, I would have to create my own amusement when all my friends went in for the night and, as my mum banned kicking a ball inside the house, I was forced to play a safer form of footie using a balloon, playing slow motion in the hallway. Today the balloon has taken on a different role in my minds eye. It has become a symbol for freedom, hopes and dreams. So to celebrate all the people that helped shape me into the man I am today I have painted the “Happy days” collection.

May all your dreams, hopes and aspirations continue to be a part of your own journey through life and may they never leave you.

  • Format: Limited Edition
  • Medium: Sculpture
  • Style: Figurative
  • Colour: Copper
  • Sculpture Size: 41 x 15 CM
  • Authentication: Certificate

You can also...

Bookmark and share Print this page Add to wish list Ask a question Write a review
View in 3DAMI Wheee!

Click on image to enlarge

 

 

« Back to Figurative